Ash Imagery - Philadelphia Wedding Photographer

Philadelphia Wedding & Portrait Photographer

Ash Imagery is a film photographer based in Philadelphia and Upstate NY.  Ash Imagery will photograph weddings and elopements in Philadelphia, Lake Placid, the Adirondacks and around the world.  Ash Imagery also offers Boudoir photographer and commercial photography such as lifestyle sessions.  Ash Imagery is considered to be a Film Wedding Photographer and a Film Photographer with a unique style and vision.  Ash Imagery is owned by Michael Ash Smith, a portrait and lifestyle photographer based in Philadelphia using film as his primary medium.

Ashley & Jay. A Cairnwood Estate Wedding.

When I arrived to the wedding venue it was an overcast day in Philadelphia. The forecast was 30% chance of rain all day .. typical for a late spring wedding in the area. Pretty much every day is like that. The event coordinator for the venue asked Ashley (the bride) early on about setting the ceremony up indoors (under a tent in the back of the building) or outdoors (on the front steps of the mansion). Without hesitation Ashley consulted me. I told her to keep it on for outside ... we'd be ok since we still had a couple hours until ceremony time and I'm a weather nerd so I had my radar up and running on my phone. A short time later a light rain fell outside ... but only for a few minutes. Not too long after that I received word from a friend in the bridal party (who happens to be a photographer as well) that the coordinator was setting up chairs under the tent. 

This is the point where I stepped in rather then backing of and I spoke up. 

"A 30% chance of rain only means there's a 70% chance it won't. That's pretty darn good odds." And whats the worst that could happen - people get a little wet? Thats just something they'll talk about after the wedding ... no big deal. I told Ashley I think she should have the ceremony outside. She trusted me completely and had a bridesmaid inform the coordinator of our decision. The chairs go outside. And I'll be honest, I checked the radar and looked outside obsessively from that point. 

30 minutes before the ceremony the clouds start breaking. 
15 minutes before the ceremony the sun makes its presence known.

Ceremony time. Sun is out. All is good. The ceremony is incredible. Admittedly, I breathe a sigh of relief.